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Television is Impacting Your Child’s Developing Brain

by Dr. Stephanie Louie on July 15, 2014 · 1 comment

Researches have found that by the time a child reaches the age of two, 90% of them are regularly watching TV, DVD’s and videos. Because a child’s brain develops at an exponential pace during the first few years of life, The American Pediatric Association recommends that TV and other entertainment media such as computers, tablets and smart phones should be avoided for infants and children under two. The Canadian Pediatric Society also warns that too much time spent watching various media is linked to problems with attention, learning and aggressive behavior, while other studies show that media can also cause problems with sleeping, obesity and eating disorders, and also elicit risky behaviours.

You may be asking yourself why excess exposure to media is bad. Between the ages of zero and two, an infant’s brain is rapidly developing, and will triple in size. A child’s brain will continue to develop until a person reaches their early 20’s. Too much stimulation during these crucial times of brain development can actually have serious adverse side effects, including problems with functioning, attention deficit, cognitive delays, impaired learning, increased impulsivity, and delayed development.

Dr Stephanie Louie, a native of Victoria, is a chiropractor with a family practice that has a focus on prenatal, infant and pediatric wellness. When she is not with her patients you may be able to find her outdoors spending time with her family exploring Vancouver Island and all its beautiful treasures.  To learn more about Dr Louie please visit www.DrStephanieLouie.com or call 250-885-2320

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Tammy Jeske August 12, 2014 at 7:37 pm

FYI- An expert report: The Impact Of Screen Media On Children: A Eurovision For Parliament

http://www.whywaldorfworks.org/06_Global/documents/EURO-ScreenMedia.pdf

“Screen time must now be considered a major public health issue and reducing screen time must become the new priority for child health”.

There is also growing concern for children and fetuses exposed to chronic and cumulative wireless radiation with replicated studies showing genetic damage to cells, including DNA fragmentation in sperm. In May 2011, the WHO classified all sources of wireless radiation as a cancer threat (2B), comparable to DDT, lead and engine exhaust, advising caution and pragmatic measures to reduce children’s daily exposure.

AAP letter to FCC re: RF exposure and risk to children.
http://apps.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view?id=7520941318

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